Empedocles’s Poem, Philosophically Taken

Judging from the fragments which have come down to us, the philosophical value of Empedocles seems to be inferior even to that of Anaxagoras. In any case, we are not shocked to learn that his “theology” is handled in a teasing and contemptuous language by Plato (cf., in particular, Soph., 242, a) and the praise …

(On the way to silence?)

Although modern man is not particularly inclined to “mystical” Silence, the “absolute” or definitive Silence with which the Thesis of Philosophy ends does not disappoint him beyond measure. Even a pure Intellectual would resign himself to silence if he were sure that no one else would speak with a view to contradict him. On the …

A NOTE ON Parmenides

A NOTE ON Parmenides Parmenides must have and perhaps hoped to fascinate, if not to captivate with the paradoxical, everyone, by asserting (if he really did) that Being is more or less “identical” to thought or, more exactly, that Thought [or: that to think, that is to say the fact, the very result of thought, …

הנהר של הרקליטוס

הפילוסופיה של הרקליטוס להיות חכם, לדבר באופן תבוני, זה לומר את האמת; ואנחנו יכולים לעשות זאת רק על ידי דיבורים על הקוסמוס הזה, שהוא זהה לכולם ( שם, …הנהר של הרקליטוס Tags: greek tragedy, Heidegger, Parmenides, אונטולוגיה, אפלטון, דיאלקטיקה, הגל, היידגר, הרקליטוס: פילוסוף יווני קדם-סוקרטי, ספרות, פילוסופיה, פילוסופיה יוונית, פרה-סוקרטיים, פרמינדס

The Sophistic Theory of Protagoras

I would like to briefly analyze the best known Sophistic Theory, namely that of Protagoras. If we take literally what is said about Protagoras in the Theaetetus (161, a -168, c), we see that Plato ranks Protagoras among the “Heracliteans” (in the broad sense). Indeed, Plato puts in the mouth of Protagoras the following summary …

Empedocles and the Parmenidean Poem

Judging from the evidence that has come down to us, Empedocles’ philosophical value seems to be inferior even to that of Anaxagoras. In any case, we are not shocked by the mockeries of Plato (cf. in particular Soph., 242, a) and the (quite relative) praise of Aristotle (cf. Met., 985 4-22 and 1000 “25) seems …

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